# Luhmann always worked on something easier and interesting

Niklas Luhmann had written more than 70 books and 400 articles on various subjects. The amount of writing he had written is not only a matter of quantity, but of quality as well. Luhmann's "The Society of Society" was so radical that not only it changed sociology, but stirred debate in philosophy, education, political theory, and psychology as well (Ahrens 14).

Despite the abnormally impressive productivity that Luhmann demonstrated, he never did anything that he thought was not interesting (Ahrens 15). From his interview:

I only do what is easy. I only write when I immediately know how to do it, if I falter for a moment, I put the matter aside and do something else.

What is "something else" in Luhmann's world? If he's stuck, he would switch context and write on something easier (Ahrens 141). From his interview:

Well, writing other books. I always work on different manuscripts at the same time. With this method, to work on different things simultaneously, I never encounter any blockages.


# References

Ahrens, How to Take Smart Notes (p. 14).

When he finished the final chapter, almost exactly 29 and a half years later, as a two-volume book with the title of "The Society of Society" (1997), it stirred up the scientific community. It was a radical new theory that not only changed sociology, but stirred heated discussions in philosophy, education, political theory and psychology as well. Not everyone was able to follow the discussions, though. What he did was unusually sophisticated, very different and highly complex.

Ahrens, How to Take Smart Notes (p. 15).

He not only stressed that he never forced himself to do something he didn't feel like, he even said: "I only do what is easy. I only write when I immediately know how to do it. If I falter for a moment, I put the matter aside and do something else." (Luhmann et al., 1987, 154f.)

Ahrens, How to Take Smart Notes (p. 141).

Remember: Luhmann's answer to the question of how one person could be so productive was that he never forced himself to do anything and only did what came easily to him. "When I am stuck for one moment, I leave it and do something else". When he was asked what else he did when he was stuck, his answer was: "Well, writing other books [...]" (Luhmann, Baecker, and Stanitzek 1987, 125-55)

Link to the interview (Ahrens 16 footnote): Niklas Luhmann - Beobachter im Krähennest (eng sub) - YouTube